Report | Environment Georgia

2017-2018 Georgia Legislative Environmental Scorecard

The Georgia legislature meets for 40 days every year and sessions last for two years. Over the course of a session hundreds of bills are introduced, debated, amended and some make it to the Governor for final approval. Incredibly important topics like water contamination from toxic coal waste, increased transit, solar power and measures to expand Georgia’s green space were all part of the 2017-18 legislative session.

This scorecard will help you understand your legislator’s conservation record and hold them accountable. We’ve also worked to highlight legislators who went above and beyond for our air, water and greenspace because important work to protect our environment often doesn’t always result in a vote on the floor of the State House or Senate.

News Release | Environment Georgia

MORE OFTEN THAN NOT GA CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION FAILS TO STAND UP FOR OUR ENVIRONMENT AND OUR FAMILIES’ HEALTH

 

Atlanta (Dec. 6, 2017) -- Today, Environment Georgia released its federal scorecard evaluating how the Peach State congressional delegation has voted when it comes to supporting clean air, clean water and other environmental protections. Absences count against a member's score. Executive Director Jennette Gayer released the following statement:

Friday morning at 5 a.m. The sky is dark, but the roads are clear and I’m just a few miles away from my AirBnb in Murfreesboro, Tennessee — valuables, pup and nourishment in tow. After 18 hours of driving, I’m exhausted but grateful to be out of harm’s way.

News Release | Environment Georgia

Environmental Groups File Clean Water Act Suit vs. Pilgrim's Pride

[Atlanta, GA] –  Environment Georgia called on Pilgrim’s Pride to clean up its act, as its sister organization in Florida filed a lawsuit under Clean Water Act against the company for dumping pollution into a river there.  The complaint filed in federal court alleges that the second-largest chicken producer in the world committed 1,377 days of Clean Water Act violations at its Florida processing plant since 2012, by discharging wastewater into the Suwannee River that exceeds pollution standards by as much as triple the legal limits.  

Report | Environment America Research & Policy Center

Get the Lead Out

Over the past two years, the tragedy of Flint, Michigan has stunned the nation. We watched the drinking water of an entire city become contaminated with lead. And now we know this toxic threat extends well beyond Flint to communities across the country. In fact, test results now show that lead is even contaminating drinking water in schools and pre-schools — flowing from thousands of fountains and faucets where our kids drink water every day.

Report | Environment Georgia

Conservation Scorecard 2015-1016

This Scorecard is about evaluating the most important action our legislators take: voting. Georogia's legislative sessions are two years long and in the 2015-16 session we scored every legislator for their votes on bills that protected our coast from a pipeline project, stopped an effort to prohibit 'bag bans,' support solar energy and much more.

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News Release | Environment Georgia

Environment Georgia Releases State Environmental Scorecard

Atlanta, GA—Environment Georgia has released a scorecard that tracks the environmental votes that state senators and representatives took during the 2015 and 2016 legislative session.

News Release | Environment America

Clean water wins as Congress rejects budget rider

Due to overwhelming public support, the Clean Water Rule has now withstood every attack that polluters could muster in Congress - the Barrasso bill, the CRA measure, and now an attempted budget rider.  Polluters and their allies have played all their dirty water cards in Congress and lost.   

Clean water not green water

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Last year at this time, the toxic algae bloom in Lake Erie caused nearly half a million people in and around Toledo, Ohio, to be without safe drinking water. Clean water from our taps is something that many of us take for granted, but if we don’t protect our water sources — like the residents of Toledo discovered — we won’t be able to take it for granted anymore.