Environment Georgia partners with Georgia River Network to protect the Okefenokee

With thousands of petition signatures in hand, we recently took to the phones to protect the Okefenokee. 

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Mary Katherine Moore
Creative Associate

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Creative Associate

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.

With thousands of petition signatures in hand, we recently took to the phones to protect the Okefenokee. 

After Environment Georgia and our national network helped gather more than 11,000 petition signatures urging Gov. Brian Kemp to halt the development of a dangerous titanium mine near the Okefenokee, we stepped up again for the swamp. In January 2020, we partnered with the Georgia River Network on a campaign that connected more than 1,800 concerned Georgians by phone with the office of Gov. Brian Kemp. Callers urged Gov. Kemp to restore the protections that the Trump administration’s Dirty Water Rule removed from the swamp. 

“The Okefenokee is one of Georgia’s seven natural wonders. If the development of the  titanium mine is allowed to carry forward, irreversible damage will surely be done to the swamp and its wildlife,” said Environment Georgia State Director Jennette Gayer. 

We will continue working with the Georgia River Network as we work to stop this ecological misadventure.

Learn more about the threat to the Okefenokee.

Read more about our clean water campaign. 

Tell Georgia's governor: Protect the Okefenokee Swamp

The Okefenokee Swamp isn't just home to the largest wildlife refuge in the eastern United States. It's also home to hundreds of plant, reptile, bird and mammal species. And it needs our protection. Join us in calling on Gov. Briak Kemp to protect these wetlands. 

Photo: In addition to its impacts on wildlife and potential pollution, the mine could also lower water levels in the Okefenokee. Credit: a.dombrowski via Flickr, CC by SA 2.0

Mary Katherine Moore
Creative Associate

Author: Mary Katherine Moore

Creative Associate

Started on staff: 2020
B.A., magna cum laude, Boston University

Mary Katherine creates print and digital content with the Creative Team for The Public Interest Network, with a focus on Environment America and its state affiliates. Mary Katherine lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she enjoys reading, running, baking and hiking.