Building Keystone hits the accelerator on global warming

The planet is heating up. Since 2000, we've experienced 16 of the 17 hottest years on record and this past year was the hottest. Scientists say there’s a limit to how much carbon we can add to the atmosphere before global warming spirals out of control. We’re starting to bend the curve of rising emissions, but not quickly enough.

In other words, we have to put the brakes on global warming pollution. Building Keystone puts our foot on the accelerator.

Specifically, building Keystone XL would add 27.4 million metric tons of carbon pollution to our atmosphere every year. That's the equivalent of putting another 5.7 million cars on the road. 

Tar Sands Oil Field

A threat to America’s heartland and the great boreal forests

While burning this oil would heat up the planet, it’s not the only reason building Keystone is a bad idea. Pumping it through the U.S. would threaten America's water. The 1,700 mile pipeline would cross 1,073 rivers, lakes and streams as well as one of the world’s largest and most important aquifers, the Ogallala, the irrigation source of America's agricultural heartland. We’ve seen what happens when tar sands pipelines spill, and it ain’t pretty. A 2011 tar sands pipeline blowout contaminated 38 miles of Michigan’s Kalamazoo River — the cleanup cost more than a billion dollars and it still isn’t done yet.

Kalamazoo River Oil Spill 

Beyond our borders, but still on our planet, extracting the oil from the Canadian tar sands will further damage the great boreal forest that spans much of Northern Canada, converting what was once pristine wildlife habitat into an apocalyptic landscape of mines, roads and waste pits so large they can be seen from space.

Boreal Forest in Canada

Our shared victory is in jeopardy

We've been here before. As part of a coalition of ranchers, farmers, Native Americans and others, we spent years working to stop the Keystone XL pipeline. In 2015, President Obama rejected the Keystone XL. President Trump's executive order once again puts Keystone XL on a fast track to construction. He also signed an order advancing the Dakota Access pipeline.

No one thought we could stop the pipeline the first time. The oil industry promised jobs and cheaper oil. That's a tough argument to beat -- even though the facts didn't back it up.

But together with our allies, we made a strong moral case for action -- and we won. Our challenge this time is even greater, and we need to be able to count on you.

Campaign Updates

News Release | Environment Georgia

City of Atlanta Committee Passes 100% Clean Energy Resolution

Atlanta—Today the City of Atlanta’s Utility Committee passed a resolution that would commit the city to generating  100 percent of the electricity consumed in the City through renewable energy resources and associated technologies by 2035. The City’s own facilities would need to be powered by 100 percent clean energy by 2025. The resolution passed with one dissenting vote from Councilmember Howard Shook and will be presented to the full Atlanta City Council at their meeting on Monday May 1st, 2017.

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News Release | Environment Georgia

Decatur Proclaims Solar Avenue for Earth Day

Today, Mayor Patti Garrett of Decatur, Georgia proclaimed that Third Avenue will be named Solar Avenue in honor of Earth Day.Third Avenue had ten neighbors purchase solar through the Solarize Decatur-DeKalb program. With one extra neighbor purchasing solar earlier, that means the highest concentration of homes with solar in Decatur is onThird Avenue.

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Our Health at Risk

Despite decades of progress under the Clean Air Act, Americans across the country continue to breathe unhealthy air, leading to increased risk of premature death, asthma attacks and other adverse health impacts.

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News Release | Environment Georgia

New Data Shows Solar Jobs Growing in Georgia

Atlanta, GA - Solar in Georgia now employs 3,924 people, a 23% increase from 2015, according to new data released today by the Solar Foundation. . Metro Atlanta was home to the most solar jobs (2,406) followed by Chatham and Bibb Counties. The Solar Foundation data breaks down solar jobs in Georgia by county, congressional district and metro area.

Atlanta, GA -
Solar in Georgia now employs 3,924 people, a 23% increase from 2015, according
to new data released today by the Solar Foundation. . Metro Atlanta was home to
the most solar jobs (2,406) followed by Chatham and Bibb Counties. The Solar
Foundation data
breaks down solar jobs in Georgia by county, congressional district and metro
area.

 

The new numbers come from the Solar Foundation’s 2016 solar
jobs census. In 2016, solar jobs grew in 44 states including GA; solar now
employs over 260,000 people nationwide.

 

The growth in solar jobs reflects the growth of solar itself.
In 2016, solar was the number one new source of energy capacity installed in
the United States. As solar grows, it has also reduced climate-warming
emissions and helped to combat air pollution in Georgia.

 

Jennette Gayer from Environment Georgia released the following
statement:

 

“Lately, Americans have had a hard time agreeing on some
important issues facing our country. But I think we can all agree that solar
energy is good for our economy, good for our environment and good for our local
communities.

 

“As the numbers released today show, solar continues to grow
rapidly in Metro-Atlanta and throughout Georgia, providing good local jobs for Georgians
that also help to protect the environment.

 

“Every solar job we add in Georgia means we will continue to
reduce carbon emissions, improve air quality and protect public health --
all  while putting people to work in
their communities.

 

“Ultimately we know we can and must repower our lives using
100 percent renewable energy in Georgia and across the country. We encourage
leaders in all sectors to help solar continue to grow and meet this challenge.
In doing so, Georgians will continue to benefit.”

 

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Renewable Energy 100

America’s institutions of higher education can play a crucial role in the fight to prevent the worst impacts of global warming. Colleges and universities across the country should aggressively deploy clean energy on campus, setting a goal of getting 100 percent of their energy from clean renewable sources.

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