Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

News Release | Environment Georgia

Georgia’s Parks Receive Valentine’s Day Love

Atlanta – Today, on the 50th anniversary of its original introduction, a bipartisan group of U.S. Senators introduced S.338, to fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund, a public land acquisition program that has helped protect places like The Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area and the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia.

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News Release | Environment Georgia

President Recommits to Tackling Global Warming in Inaugural Address

Atlanta  – Minutes ago, President Obama concluded his second inaugural address. State Advocate of Environment Georgia, Jennette Gayer, made the following statement in response: 

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News Release | Environment Georgia

President Obama, Congress Save Wind Power in Fiscal Cliff Agreement

Atlanta, GA– Today President Obama will sign into law a bill that extends key tax credits for wind power and averts the ‘fiscal cliff.’ The main federal incentives for wind power – the renewable energy Production Tax Credit (PTC) and the offshore wind Investment Tax Credit (ITC) – expired on December 31, 2012, but with today’s new law will now be available for wind power projects that start construction over the next year, allowing for continued growth of wind power in the U.S. and setting the stage for offshore wind in Georgia.

 

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News Release | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

New Soot Standards will Save Lives

Atlanta, GA—Today the Obama administration strengthened air quality standards for particulate matter or “soot” pollution.  Soot pollution is the deadliest of the common air pollutants, causing thousands of premature deaths every year across the country through a variety of cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses.  It also contributes to haze that hangs over many of the country’s most scenic parks and wilderness areas.  Sources of soot pollution include power plants and diesel trucks and buses.  The strengthened standards, issued by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, outline how much soot pollution can be in the air and still be safe to breathe, and better reflect the latest scientific research.

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Report | Environment Georgia Research & Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

Coal- and natural gas-fired power plants pollute our air, are major contributors to global warming, and consume vast amounts of water—harming our rivers and lakes and leaving less water for other uses. Wind energy has none of these problems. It produces no air pollution, makes no contribution to global warming, and uses no water.

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